Archives for category: Legacy

Bravery

Today’s gratitude challenge is about Bravery. I began to think of all the common definitions of this term such as valor, courage, and fearlessness. I briefly recalled images of 15th Century Knights in battle. Why? I’m guessing this is the sort of thing we are taught as children. We read epic stories of the hero who must face some sort of danger, or we’ve watched too much television to make a clear determination for the definition. And then I asked myself if the average person can express bravery. I am certain of it; although I’m not exactly sure that some type of fear is not involved; for instance, when I was about to enter the hospital to allow a surgeon to deliver my daughter through cesarean section. I’m sure I wasn’t expressing the courage I hoped to have. Going under the knife was and is a scary prospect for any woman about to birth her first child. Anything can happen. Fortunately, for me, my doctor delivered her without any problems.

If I think back to that day, I was met with all sorts of procedures that would have left anyone frightened. At one point, I had to hold as still as possible, so that the spinal injection was completed accurately. Okay, but I couldn’t control the one performing the action. I’m sure my mind was conjecturing all sorts of woes had I moved or the needle suddenly slipped.

Later, as a mother, I faced many possible dangers. Raising a child is terrifying. Does that make me a brave person? I’m not so sure. What is brave is stepping up and fulfilling the role of a mother – working tirelessly to keep the child comfortable and secure. These are strategies that we are not taught. I fumbled my way through it all. Bravery is like that. We expand ourselves to do what is needed.

I’m not necessarily only speaking of motherhood. Many people face different types of demons every day – usually internal ones. We surmise what others might think of us. This fear can be paralyzing. Some of us would rather expire than to plunge into the fear that our thoughts create and keep us weak. Talk to people in sales who will explain the hours wasted because they could not pick up a telephone to call a prospective client. That fear of rejection runs deep.

Most don’t even think about the dangers around us. Starting a motor vehicle and driving in rush hour traffic takes bravery. What about beginning a new job? It takes a certain type of bravery to overcome new tasks and learn new names. Natural disasters seem commonplace these days. The news broadcasts are quick to show the devastating live footage.

How does one go about mustering up courage in times like these? Adrenaline might be one answer. Try these ideas instead:

* Aim to build up confidence by doing things that make you uncomfortable without any immediate danger
* Hone your skills in certain areas to help you do something you like, and do it well
* Believe in yourself – an area where we tend to demonstrate a deep, cavernous lack

And mostly, believe in yourself. Chances are, others believe in you and your abilities. It’s not hype.
Negative self-talk is detrimental to your well-being in all cases. Thank goodness we are not our thoughts.

Have faith; bravery is not elusive. You might surprise yourself someday. When you do, write it down. Tell some friends, and pat yourself on the back while you get ready to do more. Reward yourself if you need to.

These tactics will help build some resilient muscles.

My wish is that you become the best version of you.

Joy,

Cheryl

Life is an open-air market. We have before us, each day, an array of choices. These choices are equally good, and just waiting to be chosen.

Celebrate the fiesta!

Look around. An abundance of life is at our fingertips. Open-air market - britannica

Photo: Courtesy of Britannica.com

 

Joy,

Cheryl

Lagomarsino Petroglyphs July 2015

Lagomarsino Petroglyphs July 2015

These are the engravings of ancient peoples. Lagomarsino Canyon, NV

These are the engravings of ancient peoples. Lagomarsino Canyon, NV


On the day we decided to head to the Lagomarsino Canyon Petrogylph site, we really didn’t know what to expect or exactly where we’d find them. Our journey was filled with a bit of rocky terrain and a couple of washed out roads. Yes, even in the Nevada desert which looked more like a lush forest in this area. Flooded road
When we arrived, we were met by a gate – the kind you’d see that allows someone into a typical high school playground – big enough for one at a time. As you can see from the two photos, the carvings were done by ancient people who lived thousands of years before us. We were shocked by the simplicity of each one. We spent some time there taking various pictures of the engravings and the beautiful surroundings. It was a picture perfect weather day – the sky intensely blue. Which road do we take?

As I reflect on the observation of these and the location, I questioned the purpose of the engravings. While we do not yet know what each means, we can gain a sense of why people choose to create art that speaks to a possible future that our bodily remains cannot. It seems these petroglyphs are speakers, the recordings of a life or many lives.

Digging into rock is an incredible feat. Ever try it? It’s darn near impossible unless you have the correct tools. Imagine how long it took to engrave such intricacies into this material. Speaking of material, anyone would have to use what is readily available to make his mark on the world – to leave behind a legacy or story. Do you leave behind your own form of depictions? Do you speak from your chosen medium, say poetry, story-telling, music, writing, or do you communicate in hieroglyphics which need interpretation? Are your signs so encrypted no one understands them? Perhaps the answer is the same for the very primitive shapes made upon the rocks. Too intricate, and the image is spoiled due to a lack of space and possibly unreliable carving tools. Too simple, and your idea may be better explained in words. I’ve thought of the process of these particular carvings and wondered if in fact these were done with an accompanied tale of their reality or just something made up. One of the pictographs is clearly an old man, but just underneath is a more rounded humanoid figure possibly holding a laser gun.

So next time you’re thinking of leaving a legacy, think of impact you would like to have on those in the future. Do you want your story to be clear, or one that has future beings pondering the possible meanings?

Joy,
Cheryl

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